Monthly Archives: February 2016

Informational Waves in Awareness

Informational Waves in Awareness

Vinod D Deshmukh, MD, PhD

Every observed event creates an informational wave (IW) in a person’s brain-mind. In the brain, it looks like an electrochemical signal, which travels as an electrochemical wave. In awareness, it is a momentary experience, which may be conscious or subconscious with or without memory, a future recall and cognition.

Each IW creates an information/signal (attentional) vector, which specifies situational space-time and the observer-observed duality, followed by a stream of experiential events and individual mental reactions.

IW are analogous to electromagnetic and gravitational waves in the existential pond. Awareness matrix is like an experiential pond. In the spontaneous, pristine and unperturbed state of matrix-awareness (the experiential pond), there are no dualistic events and therefore no specific individual experience or personal space-time. But, it is a unique, ineffable, blissful, benevolent, and primordial self-aware feeling. It is our true universality, in which our limited individual personality is ever nested.

Vinod D Deshmukh, MD, PhD

February 16, 2016

Positive Psychology

Positive Psychology

 

Positive psychology is a field of psychological theory and research that focuses on the psychological states (e.g., contentment, joy) individual traits or character strengths (e.g., intimacy, integrity, altruism, wisdom), and social institutions that make life most worth living.

 

Positive affect is the internal feeling state that occurs when a goal has been attained, a source of threat has been avoided, or the individual is satisfied with the present state of affairs. The tendency to experience such states is called positive affectivity.

 

Martin Seligman, in his presidential address to the American Psychological Association in 1998, emphasized the concept of “Positive Psychology.” He defined good life as 1) a pleasant life full of positive emotions, 2) an engaged life with creative engagement, and 3) a meaningful life filled with meaning and purpose.

 

Positive Psychology emphasizes six core domains: 1) virtues and character strengths, 2) happiness, 3) growth fulfillment of capacities and development of higher self, 4) good life, 5) thriving and flourishing, 6) positive functioning under conditions of stress, and 7) nurturing gratitude, forgiveness, awe, inspiration, hope, curiosity and laughter.

 

Is not meditation a way to a good life and positive affectivity?

 

References:

  • The APA Dictionary of Psychology (2007).
  • Positive Psychology: An Approach to Supporting Recovery in Mental Illness. B Schrank, T Brownell, A Tylee, M Slade. East Asian Arch Psychiatry 2014; 24:95-103 Theme Paper.